Tessellatica

This page contains the current release of Tessellatica, a Mathematica notebook for the design and analysis of origami with particular emphasis on origami tessellations. You'll need a current version of Mathematica to use it.

Beginning with Tessellatica 11.x, the version numbering matches that of the version of Mathematica that it is tuned for (e.g., Tessellatica 11.x is tuned for Mathematica 11).

Downloads

Creative Commons License
Tessellatica (all versions) by Robert J. Lang are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.
  • Tessellatica 11.0 [2017-06-23]
    Quadrilateral and triangle meshes, strained surfaces with bent facets, and curved folds. Requires Mathematica 11.
  • Tessellatica 2.6 [2016-06-26]
    More complex twist tubes, including joints between two tubes with varying cross sections and offsets. Requires Mathematica 10.
  • Tessellatica 2.5 [2016-04-04]
    Many changes to add better support for periodic patterns, including Miura-ori and generalizations, Huffman grids, and twist tubes. Requires Mathematica 10.
  • Tessellatica 2.4 (for Mathematica 10) [2015-3-14]
    Extensive changes to support tiling-based tessellations, including centered twists, offset twists, and the geometry of Brocard polygons. Requires Mathematica 10.
  • Tessellatica 2.4 [2015-3-14]
    Extensive changes to support tiling-based tessellations, including centered twists, offset twists, and the geometry of Brocard polygons. Requires Mathematica 9.
  • Tessellatica 2.1 [2014-12-18]
    Adds support for perforated scoring of crease patterns, veneer scoring, and improved implementations of tiling-based tessellations, along with the usual menagerie of bugfixes. (Note: tiling-based tessellations are probably going to keep changing.) Requires Mathematica 9.
  • Tessellatica 2.0a2 [2014-09-13]
    Various bugfixes and small additions. Requires Mathematica 9.
  • Tessellatica 2.0a1 [2014-08-08]
    First public release! Requires Mathematica 9.

The code is (attempted to be) self-documenting with explanations and examples provided with the definitions of most functions. Open the notebook in Mathematica, read the material at the top, and execute the entire notebook to see all of the examples.