Posts: software

Computational Origami

This page contains links to computational tools useful for origami design and for combining origami with mathematical or scientific applications. See here for additional links about origami math, science, and technology. See here for additional links not specifically related to mathematical and scientific origami. If you’ve got a computational origami tool you’d like listed, send […]

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Polypolyhedra

Background In 1999, I became interested in a family of origami modulars composed of interwoven polygonal frames and/or polyhedral skeletons, the most famous of which was devised by Tom Hull, which he titled Five Intersecting Tetrahedra, now commonly known by its abbreviation, FIT. (See here for a description.) The underlying polyhedron—a compound of five tetrahedra […]

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Science Links

This page contains various and sundry links to web pages that combine origami with mathematical or scientific applications. See here for links related to computational origami (software for origami design and analysis). See here for additional links not specifically related to mathematical and scientific origami. Please let me know if you find any broken links […]

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Airbag Folding

What could origami possibly have to do with automotive airbags? Quite a lot, it turns out. Sorry, your browser doesn’t support embedded videos. Animation of an airbag deployment for which the mesh was generated using an origami design algorithm. The origami creases appear in the flattening you see in the first seconds of the animation. […]

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Origami Conferences

Since 1989, there have been several highly successful international scientific conferences exploring the interactions between origami, mathematics, science, and (since 2001) education. The conferences take place at irregular intervals—basically, whenever a general chair and sponsoring organization decide that the time has come for the next. Beginning in 2015, the OSME series of conferences is guided […]

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4OSME

2006-10-16 Update: 4OSME was a rousing success! Over 165 people attended some 70 talks. The 4OSME proceedings has been published by A K Peters, Ltd (now part of CRC Press). Several media groups covered 4OSME. See photographs and a trailer from Green Fuse Films’ Peabody-award-winning documentary on origami (portions of which were filmed at 4OSME), […]

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OrigamiUSA’s The Fold

Starting in November, 2010, I began writing a regular column on crease patterns (with occasional forays into other topics) for OrigamiUSA’s then-new online publication, The Fold. You’ll need to be a member of OrigamiUSA to read the articles, but in my highly biased opinion, it’s well worth the cost (not just for my articles, but […]

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TreeMaker

Background In 1989, I wrote an article for the magazine Engineering & Science about the state of technical folding, which, even then, seemed to be progressing by leaps and bounds due to an infusion of scientific and mathematical principles. In recounting some of the connections between origami, math, and technology, I wrote: Computing succumbed to […]

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Tessellatica

This page contains the current release of Tessellatica, a Mathematica notebook for the design and analysis of origami with particular emphasis on origami tessellations. You’ll need a current version of Mathematica to use it. Beginning with Tessellatica 11.x, the version numbering matches that of the version of Mathematica that it is tuned for. Specifically, the […]

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Origami Simulation

Background In the 1980s, I made the acquaintance of Jacobo (Jack) Fastag, a graduate student like myself who was interested in exploring the interactions between computers and origami. We both had hit upon the idea of exploring the ability to simulate origami folding on a computer, and each set out to write our own origami […]

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ReferenceFinder

Background During the development of technical folding that began in the 1980s, a new problem arose for the origami designer: how to find the major creases in the base by folding alone. This didn’t used to be a problem. In the traditional “trial-and-error” approach to origami composition, the design was discovered via exploration of folding. […]

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Tessellatica and Web-Love from Wolfram

Wolfram gives me some web-ness: Above the Fold: Mathematica Transforms Ancient Art of Origami By coincidence, today I also learned that my 6OSME paper on Tessellatica was accepted (along with some others). So come to Tokyo in August, 2014 to get your free copy! (*) (*) Actually, you’ll be able to get a free copy […]

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